Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest can occur anytime, anywhere. Current literature have agreed that bystander CPR can significantly increase the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. A recent study in Sweden has reviewed the data from 2000 to 2017, which included 30,445 patients. It shows that the survival rate of patients is not only increased but also doubled in receiving either standard CPR (i.e. including both chest compressions and rescue breaths) or chest-compression-only CPR (COCPR) in comparison with those not receiving CPR before arrival of emergency responders. 


In addition, as mentioned in previous studies, COCPR is easier to perform and more acceptable to the public than standard CPR. The findings of this study show that COCPR is associated with higher rates of bystander-initiated CPR. In the reviewed periods, the receiving rate of COCPR has increased 6 times, and the proportion of patients receiving CPR before arrival of emergency responders is increased from 40.8% in period 1 (i.e. 2000 – 2005) to 68.2% in period 3 (i.e. 2011-2017). This shows that bystanders are more willing to initiate COCPR. 


COCPR is currently considered an alternative to standard CPR. It is recommended for people who are unable or unwilling to perform rescue breaths. This study also supports that COCPR is as effective as standard CPR, as the 30-day survival rate of those patients receiving COCPR is similar to those with standard CPR.


To conclude, the findings of this study show that COCPR is as effective as standard CPR. In addition, COCPR is associated with a higher rate of bystander-initiated CPR before arrival of emergency responders and promotes the overall survival rate of victims in OHCA. These findings support the continuous promotion of COCPR and endorsement of COCPR in CPR guidelines, so as to further increase the survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. 



Reference:

Riva G, Ringh M, Jonsson M, Svensson L, Herlitz J, Claesson A, et al. Survival in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest After Standard Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation or Chest Compressions Only Before Arrival of Emergency Medical Services: Nationwide Study During Three Guideline Periods. Circulation [Internet]. 2019 [cited 2019Apr23];139. Available from: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038179